HEADY: Lindsey Moore should be point guard for men’s team

By Chris Heady on January 29th, 2013

You might think I’m as dumb as Ron Artest’s name change, but hear me out.

I think Nebraska women’s basketball guard Lindsey Moore could start for the men’s team.

Your reaction, I’m sure, is probably somewhat similar to the guffaw I faced when I first said this aloud to some friends, but I don’t think my hypothesis is such a stretch of the imagination.

And before you get your pitchforks and torches and chase me like I’m an ogre, let’s talk this out, and maybe I’ll look like somewhat of a sane person by the end of this.

The 11-10 Nebraska men’s team has outdone itself this year, winning more games than anyone ever imagined this season already. The team has given Husker nation a slice of hope for the coming years with Tim Miles and has overall been better than the average Nebraska team.

With that said, my goodness, do they need a point guard. The men’s team has trouble running a fluid offense with five guys with anyone bringing the ball up. It has searched vigorously to find a stable starter and has yet to find it.

Enter: Lindsey Moore.

Moore, the 5-foot-9-inch senior guard from Covington, Wash., has done more than enough to earn an All-American status this year and has been the driving force for the 14-6 women’s team this year. She hits 3’s from near-NBA range and can dissect a zone in an instant. She’ll single handedly put together 8-0 or 10-0 runs with her drive and dish ability or smooth skills through the land and no, she can’t leap tall buildings in a single bound, but she’s damn-near the ideal point guard.

For the men, freshman Benny Parker has played like, well, a freshman, and struggles to score. Dylan Talley is a solid three-guard but makes better decisions than anyone else, so he is forced to bring the ball up often. And Ray Gallegos, who some say is the best men’s player, would probably only bring the ball up if he was promised he’d be able to shoot a fade-away 3 that possession.

Now I’ll give them all a break. It’s a new system with Miles, and it’s a transitional period, but a point guard needs to organize anything that goes wrong on the floor, and right now the men’s team looks as disheveled as Gary Busey’s mind, which leads to very low offensive production.

Add Moore to the mix and that could change. Combined, Parker and Talley only score 1.1 points more than Moore per game (16.4 to Moore’s 15.5), shoot 12 percentage points worse than Moore per game (35.5 to Moore’s 47) and have seven assists less than more total (103 to Moore’s 110.) Stats are tricky to debate, considering men’s teams are argued to be a higher level of competition, but it’s all relative. Moore is doing things on the women’s side that the Husker men’s team couldn’t dream about.

There’s no doubt Moore’s small size and stature would be a problem. The level of competition would be upped, and her stats would probably go down. Big Ten basketball is a grown man’s game, and the physicality would inevitably shrink Moore’s ability down. If it’s any other Big Ten team, there’s no shot she would even get minutes, but in Lincoln, the No. 1 point guard title goes to her.

But she’s the best player on the floor any time she steps on it, and if I’m at a pick-up game and somehow squandered first pick, I’m picking Moore over Parker and Talley 10 out of 10 times.

I know, I’m crazy to believe it, and you’d be nuts to agree with me, but the next time you watch a women’s game, watch how number double-zero controls her team and scores with ease, and tell me that the men’s team has anyone even near the ability to do the same thing.

Chris Heady is a freshman news-editorial major. Reach him at sports@dailynebraskan.com

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