Lead singer Jack McEwan of the Psychedelic Porn Crumpets at Lincoln Calling

Psychedelic Porn Crumpets performs at 1867 Bar during Lincoln Calling on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019, in Lincoln, Nebraska.

From Perth, Australia, comes Psychedelic Porn Crumpets, a major player in the booming psychedelic rock scene that has taken over their hometown. Other Perth psych bands like Tame Impala and Pond have set the stage for bands like Psychedelic Porn Crumpets to take their own heavier twist on the genre. 

The band is on tour currently promoting the release of their third full-length album, “And Now for the Whatchamacallit.” Their performance at Lincoln Calling 2019 at 1867 Bar was the final performance of the festival and closed a wild night filled with various other psych-rock behemoths like Triptides and Flaural.

The Porn Crumpets’ lead vocalist and guitarist Jack McEwan was kind enough to speak with the Daily Nebraskan on the drive to Lincoln from Colorado on the morning of their Lincoln Calling Performance. 

Daily Nebraskan: So how has touring for this album been different from other U.S. tours you’ve done in the past?

Jack McEwan: This one’s been great, we’ve got another member with us, Chris [Young]. Before, we were a four-piece, so now it feels like we’re really picking everything up and giving it a fatter sound. Chris gives us those guitar harmonies and the extra little bits that you hear on the record … it’s given our shows a little notch-up, and it sounds great now.

DN: Did you have to do a lot of rehearsing with Chris before you went on tour?

JM: Yeah, it took quite a while to get all the songs right. [Our song] “Bill’s Mandolin,” for example — I used to get nightmares before playing that song, knowing that we were about to play it at a festival or a gig, but now it’s the best song in the set. So getting to that point, like that two-month gap of playing it live, that’ll make it really tight, really connected.

DN: It seems like Perth is the place to be for psych-rock right now, is there anything about the town that makes it conducive to the genre or just music in general?

JM: So when Tame Impala and Pond came out, that kind of gave people the idea to go out and buy their own 60s fuzz pedals, and just diving into that genre. It was pretty soon after that that King Gizzard [and the Lizard Wizard] came out, so there were so many bands that we were influenced by. Psych kind of became what would be playing at, like, clubs and bars on the weekend, and Perth is kind of secluded so we don’t get that many international acts coming through. So its got a really strong local music scene, and when there’s a thing going on it's like since Tame Impala, there has been a lot of psych rock. I’d say it’s really similar to the Los Angeles scene, where there is quite a bit of hip-hop, but the psych scene is booming.

DN: Your music is pretty complex, with odd time signatures while still being riff-oriented. How do you go about rehearsing for something like that? 

JM: Well, I honestly couldn’t tell you what time signature it’s in most of the time, to be completely honest. A lot of times, I’ll come to the band with a riff or something and eventually we’ll figure out what the math is behind it. Our drummer Danny [Caddy] is kind of the mathematician of the band. When I don’t know what’s going on, Danny usually does. Sometimes I’ll come to him with an idea that’s, like, ‘here Danny, this will throw you off’ and he’s like, ‘nah, that’s in 4/4 time, man.’ I think if it sounds good, that’s better than if it works out mathematically.

culture@dailynebraskan.com